Company Name

  • Network Engineering Skills

    Configured Cisco Routers (2500, 3000, 4000) using RIP, IGRP, OSPF, EIGRP and Switches (5000, 3524, 2900).
    Implementation of DHCP, DNS, FTP, TFTP.
    Implemented traffic filters using Standard and Extended access-lists, Distribute-Lists, and Route Maps.
    Routing Protocol (BGP, OSPF, EIGRP, IGRP, RIP, IS-IS), Routed Protocol (TCP/IP).
    Install and Configuration of DHCP Server, DNS Server, FTP Server, Squid, Web Server On Linux.

  • Computer Programming Skills

    Office Package: Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, Microsoft PowerPoint, Microsoft Outlook Express.
    Programming Language:Pascal, C, C++, Java, Java Swing, PHP, Dot Net.
    Operating Systems: Windows9X, Windows Server200X, Windows ME, Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Linux, MS DOS.
    HTML Editing Tools: Macromedia Dreamweaver, Microsoft FrontPage, Adobe GoLive.
    Graphics Tools: Macromedia Flash, Macromedia Fireworks, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe PageMaker, Adobe Illustrator,SwishMX.

  • Technical Support Specialist

    Install Network Interface Cards NIC s . Setup bindings, IP addresses, WINS, and DNS configurations. Operate, and maintain Local Area Network LAN connectivity using TCP/IP protocol.
    Identify, troubleshoot, and analyze computer related issues. Determine appropriate course of action, and conduct repairs, modifications, and upgrade internal components and peripherals as needed.
    Plan layout of workstation locations and LAN cabling. Coordinate teardown, move, and install of office partitions, desks, and equipment. Install PC workstations, LAN cabling and setup network connectivity.
    Maintained excellent working relationships with customers, field service, sales and marketing people.



Set permissions for folders and files

If you have multiple computers connected to your home network and have enabled file sharing, you can open and access files located on other computers on the network. Being able to share files makes computing a lot more flexible for everyone using the network. If you have your files stored on your home office desktop computer, but need a break from sitting at your desk, you can take your laptop to the couch and still access your files.

It’s good to share. However, you may not want everyone on your network to have access to all of your files and folders. You might not, for example, want your kids to open your financial or personal files across the network. Fortunately, you can set file permissions to specify who can access which files and folders. Then only you and those you give permission to can touch your documents. And the permissions apply whether your computer is accessed across your network or by another user sitting at your keyboard logged into his or her account.

To restrict access to files or folders:

Create user accounts on the computer that is sharing the files. Create a user account and password for each person you want to be able to access files—whether they will access the files from their own account on the same computer or from another computer on the network. If you create the accounts using each user’s existing network logon username and password, the file-sharing computer will recognize the users when they connect and will not prompt them for a password.
Remove administrator access to your files. By default, only your user account and any user with a Computer Administrator account can access your files. To further limit access to your files and folders, you can remove administrator access.

To learn more about the differences between Computer Administrator accounts and Limited accounts, read Create and customize user accounts.

Add file and folder permissions if you want to grant other users access to your files—whether they will access on the same computer with their own accounts or from another computer across the network.

Remove administrator access to your files

By default, all Computer Administrator accounts have access to all files on your computer. You can never completely block this type of user, because administrators can take ownership of files and then grant themselves permission. However, you can remove this permission to make it more difficult for them. You can also restrict other users from accessing your files.

To remove Computer Administrator access to your files

1. Click Start, and then click My Documents.

The Start menu with My Documents selected

 

2. Select the folder or files you want to set permissions for. To select multiple files and folders, hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and click each file.
3. Right-click the selected folders and files, and then click Properties.

The My Documents folder

4. Click the Security tab.

Properties dialog box with Security tab selected

 

5. Click Advanced.

Security tab with Advanced button selected

 

6. Clear the Inherit from parent the permission entries that apply to child objects check box.

Permissions tab in Advanced Security Settings dialog box

 

7. In the Security dialog box, click Copy.

Security dialog box

 

8. In the Permission entries list, click Administrators.

Permissions tab in Advanced Security Settings dialog box with Administrators selected

Note: Windows XP uses the SYSTEM account, so you shouldn’t remove it.

9. Click Remove.

Permissions tab in Advanced Security Settings dialog box with Remove button selected

 

10. Click OK.

Permissions tab in Advanced Security Settings dialog box with OK selected

 

11. Click OK again.

Security tab in Document Properties dialog box with OK selected

Now only you and any users you specifically grant permission to can easily open your file. Next learn how to add file and folder permissions for users.

Add file and folder permissions

To allow another user on your computer (logged in under his or her own account), or on a computer connected to your home network, to open or edit your files

1. Click Start, and then click My Documents.

The Start menu with My Documents selected

 

2. Select the folder or files you want to set permissions for. To select multiple files and folders, hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard, and click each file or folder.
3. Right-click the selected folders and files, and then click Properties.

The My Documents folder

4. Click the Security tab.

Security tab in Properties dialog box

 

5. Click the Add button.

Security tab in Properties dialog box with Add button selected

 

6. In the Select Users or Groups dialog box, click the Advanced button.

Select Users or Groups dialog box with Advanced button selected

 

7. Click Find Now.

Select Users or Groups dialog box with Find Now selected

 

8. In the list at the bottom of the Select Users or Groups dialog box, click the user you want to grant permissions to. If you want to allow anybody with a user account to see your files, click Everyone. Then click OK.

Select Users or Groups dialog box with list of users displayed

 

9. Click OK again.

Select Users or Groups dialog box with OK button selected

 

10. By default, the user will only be able to open a file but will not be able to save changes. If you want the user to also be able to save changes, select the Modify check box in the Allow column. You don’t need to worry about the other check boxes.

Security tab in Properties dialog box with Modify check box selected

 

11. Repeat steps 5 through 10 to allow more people to open your files.
12. Click OK to save your changes.

Properties dialog box

Now, the people you specify will be able to open your files and, if you chose to allow it, modify your files.

This entry was posted in Microsoft.

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